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NC3Rs: National Centre for the Replacement Refinement & Reduction of Animals in Research

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A dedicated website with resources for everyone who works with, or is interested in, laboratory macaques.

A macaque eating

Learn more about why the single use of needles should be standard practice and how to implement this in your facility.

A rat being injected with a hypodermic needle
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How to recognise and prevent pain, suffering and distress in laboratory animals.

A screenshot of an e-learning module activity, with a photo of a white rat labelled with green "i" buttons to indicate where trainees can click for more information. A label reads "Body posture: the posture is normal".
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Principles and techniques for humane killing of laboratory animals.

Mice in a cage with a pipe connected to it, to be used for euthanasia.
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Post-operative pain relief for laboratory animals, including selecting and using analgesics.

A close up of an animal being injected with analgesia
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Recognising pain and assessing its severity in laboratory animals following surgery.

Screenshot of the EU 21-8 training module, featuring a mouse on a gloved hand

To support the adoption of non-aversive methods for picking up mice, we have produced an A2-sized poster for display.

Screenshot of the NC3Rs Mouse Handling poster which outlines guidance on non-aversive handling techniques for the laboratory mouse

Posters and other resources on the use of grimace scales to assess pain in laboratory animals.

The mouse, rat and rabbit grimace scale posters layered over each other.

Professor Jane Hurst and Mr John Waters answer your questions about the refined handling techniques.

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A video tutorial for technical staff and researchers in how to handle mice using non-aversive methods.

A brown mouse in a tube

Professor Jane Hurst of the University of Liverpool shares the evidence base supporting refined mouse handling techniques as well as practical advice

A brown mouse in a tube